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Health

AFP
May 2, 2017
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Low-dose aspirin can lower breast cancer risk, study says

Low-dose aspirin can lower breast cancer risk, study says

ISLAMABAD: Women who regularly take a low-dose aspirin had a lower risk of breast cancer, according to a latest study.

The study used data from more than 57,000 women who were part of the California Teachers Study, in the 23% of women who reported using low-dose aspirin regularly, researchers saw a 20% reduction in the risk of developing HR-positive/HER2 negative breast cancer, some of the most common forms of the disease, reported CNN health news.

The risk was inversely associated with taking a low-dose aspirin three or more times a week, compared with those women who had no regular low-dose aspirin use.

Women who took other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen did not see as much of a difference, nor did those taking a regular high-dose aspirin.

Previous studies have showed mixed results in breast cancer impact among women who took a regular high-dose aspirin.

Aspirin is already known for its potential to reduce other kinds of cancers and cancer deaths, particularly in people at risk of colorectal cancer.

US Preventive Services Task Force guidelines recommend that certain people take low-dose aspirin regularly to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer.

But not everyone can take it; for example, it's not recommended for people with bleeding diseases such as Crohn's or ulcers, as it can increase bleeding.

The research has showed that aspirin works as an aromatase inhibitor.


Breast cancer is often treated with medication that is a stronger form of aromatase inhibitor; it stops the production of estrogen, which can stimulate the growth of hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

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